TripleO and Ansible deployment (Part 1)

In the Queens release of TripleO, you’ll be able to use Ansible to apply the
software deployment and configuration of an Overcloud.

Before jumping into some of the technical details, I wanted to cover some
background about how the Ansible integration works along side some of the
existing tools in TripleO.

The Ansible integration goes as far as offering an alternative to the
communication between the existing Heat agent (os-collect-config) and the Heat
API. This alternative is opt-in for Queens, but we are exploring making it the
default behavior for future releases.

The default behavior for Queens (and all prior releases) will still use the
model where each Overcloud node has a daemon agent called os-collect-config
that periodically polls the Heat API for deployment and configuration data.
When Heat provides updated data, the agent applies the deployments, making
changes to the local node such as configuration, service management,
pulling/starting containers, etc.

The Ansible alternative instead uses a “control” node (the Undercloud) running
ansible-playbook with a local inventory file and pushes out all the changes to
each Overcloud node via ssh in the typical Ansible fashion.

Heat is still the primary API, while the parameter and environment files that
get passed to Heat to create an Overcloud stack remain the same regardless of
which method is used.

Heat is also still fully responsible for creating and orchestrating all
OpenStack resources in the services running on the Undercloud (Nova servers,
Neutron networks, etc).

This sequence diagram will hopefully provide a clear picture:
https://slagle.fedorapeople.org/tripleo-ansible-arch.png

Replacing the application and transport layer of the deployment with Ansible
allows us to take advantage of features in Ansible that will hopefully make
deploying and troubleshooting TripleO easier:

  • Running only specific deployments
  • Including/excluding specific nodes or roles from an update
  • More real time sequential output of the deployment
  • More robust error reporting
  • Faster iteration and reproduction of deployments

Using Ansible instead of the Heat agent is easy. Just include 2 extra cli args
in the deployment command:

-e /path/to/templates/environments/config-download-environment.yaml \
--config-download

Once Heat is done creating the stack (will be much faster than usual), a
separate Mistral workflow will be triggered that runs ansible-playbook to
finish the deployment. The output from ansible-playbook will be streamed to
stdout so you can follow along with the progress.

Here’s a demo showing what a stack update looks like:

(I suggest making the demo fully screen or watch it here: https://slagle.fedorapeople.org/tripleo-ansible-deployment-1.mp4)

Note that we don’t get color output from ansible-playbook since we are
consuming the stdout from a Zaqar queue. However, in my next post I will go
into how to execute ansible-playbook manually, and detail all of the related
files (inventory, playbooks, etc) that are available to interact with manually.

If you want to read ahead, have a look at the official documentation:
https://docs.openstack.org/tripleo-docs/latest/install/advanced_deployment/ansible_config_download.html

 

Advertisements

One thought on “TripleO and Ansible deployment (Part 1)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s